mechanics sound the alarmmechanics sound the alarmmechanics sound the alarm

by:Ultimate     2020-11-28
(Jun 12, 2006)
The mechanics of Air Canada\'s major regional airlines say they often feel pressured to cut corners and put aircraft in the air that may endanger public safety.
Some say their concerns are so serious that they are nervous about taking their own airline.
More than a dozen maintenance engineers at Air Canada\'s Jazz are working in the company\'s Toronto operations division, and they say that the economic need to keep planes flying often exceeds the safety decisions they want to make.
Four of them took unusual steps to publicly express their concerns.
\"The pressure on the plane to take off is incredible,\" said Sir mechanic Grant annastas . \".
\"I didn\'t feel the management wanted the plane to take off safely.
\"It\'s just, \'Take it out.
No one wants to be hit for delay.
\"How safe is our sky?
Over the past seven months, journalists from Hamilton bystanders, Toronto Star and Waterloo regional records have been asking questions about aviation safety.
What they found was a flight safety system that tightened at the seams.
The airline received a highly critical audit from Transport Canada in 2003, denied the company\'s allegations and said safety was a top priority.
\"Jazz never hurts safety,\" the company said in a written reply . \". \"While on-
Time performance is definitely a jazz goal. We never sacrifice safety.
\"Jazz is the second largest airline in the United States (
Next to Air Canada)
It is also one of the largest regional airlines in the world.
Nearly 6 million people fly 136 planes to 80 North American cities every year.
The Jazz mechanics who spoke to reporters said they refused to sign the aircraft for service to keep the aircraft on the ground with mechanical defects.
But they say that in many cases their superiors just find other mechanics to sign the plane-
Or they sign it. -
To avoid expensive flight delays.
\"It\'s a shame, but I was nervous when I was flying on my own airline,\" said Ronald Anstie, the airline\'s flight attendant at the Toronto hangar.
\"I asked the supervisor to ask me to log out the damaged thing --of-
Limit, fix the error (or)
Illegal repair
I was considered a troublemaker when I refused. . .
I think the management is more concerned.
It\'s more time-saving than sending a safe plane to the gate.
\"The bombing allegations raise disturbing questions about the safety of the Canadian aviation industry.
Records from Hamilton onlookers, Toronto Star and Waterloo area are investigating aviation safety and finding it difficult for a system to keep up with the increasingly crowded sky.
Over the past five years, more than 80,000 passengers have been in danger when the plane\'s sky in Canada has been dangerously close.
Meanwhile, allegations of mechanical problems and violations of aviation regulations are rising.
In a dramatic event in 2002, when it took off in Toronto, the front wing of the jazz Sprint 8 fell off with a metre of debris.
The crew returned after noticing the vibration of the flight control device.
The transportation safety committee attributed it to hasty maintenance.
This could lead to a crash, Sir mechanical said.
\"It was a small shot.
If it\'s a bigger plane, the plane will disappear, \"said Gianni Ballestrin, 34, a maintenance engineer from Jazz for seven years.
Anastas said: \"They put the screws on the top, but they never put the screws on the bottom. \"Then (a supervisor)
Pull over the people who are doing the work. . .
Do another job. .
They pulled him down and he never went back to finish it.
\"The TSB survey found that before completing the work, a maintenance supervisor called away a mechanic at work.
\"Before The Apprentice (mechanic)
What he can do is not just cut off the sealing material at the front of the right wing, he is re-
\"My task is to go to the ramp,\" the report wrote . \".
The TSB also found: * when the task was clearly not able to be completed by the end of the shift, another mechanic at work \"felt rushed \".
\"* The duties of the crew chief\" are not documented in detail and formal training is not provided.
\"* Company\" does not have specific procedures to convey the working status of shift turnover.
The report also found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation and found \"some flaws\" that caused the program to change \".
The company said the accident was not caused by the hurried mechanic not doing the work seriously.
\"This is due to human error,\" the company said in a statement . \".
\"We immediately implemented the pass in our maintenance area-
For unfinished work, the information \"swing\" procedure from the crew to the crew.
Anastas said that the procedure did change for a period of time after the incident to double-check the leader-
Edge mount, but practice sliding back to the previous way.
Another jazz mechanic who has worked at the company for nine years, Dave awella, admitted that keeping the plane in the air can cause extreme pressure.
\"There is a lot of pressure and pressure in the aircraft maintenance environment.
On-pressure
\"Time performance sometimes affects the quality of aircraft maintenance engineers and attention to detail,\" he said . \".
\"There are things we want to solve but we can\'t because we don\'t have time to do or the company doesn\'t want the plane to crash.
It could put a brutal strain on the mechanics, he said: \"Endless 12-
Hours of night shift, no meeting of family for several days, physical properties of working hours and day rotation, chemicals. . .
The list continues.
\"The Department of Transport Canada\'s audit of the airline in 2003 found that\" the focus of the maintenance and operations department has been compromised so that some of the most basic regulatory and quality control tasks have deteriorated.
Airline spokesman Debra Williams said the issues were corrected after the audit.
\"That was three years ago.
Great changes have taken place since then.
We work with the Transport Canada on all of these projects.
\"But after an accident on September 2004, the Jazz was again forced to change its maintenance practices, in which the pilot took control of Kingston\'s dashboard 8-to-
It is difficult to control the plane.
About 30 seconds after takeoff, the captain declared an emergency and later found that the emergency was related to loose nuts falling off in the aircraft pitch control system.
When the plane landed safely, a TSB survey found a defect in Jazz\'s mechanical procedure. Jazz\'s flight-
Crew training has been criticized for not being fully prepared for such an emergency.
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation again and found \"some defects \".
\"In this case, Jazz immediately took corrective action to deal with the accident by modifying its maintenance and flight operation procedures,\" the company\'s statement wrote . \".
In addition to Anastas, Anstey, Avella and Ballestrin, eight other jazz mechanics also spoke without using their names.
If the Jazz knew who they were, they feared it would be affected.
Four people on record have similar concerns, but they think public safety is more important than any disciplinary action they may face.
Several mechanics agreed that, on average, a jazz plane left Toronto Pearson International Airport once a week and that mechanical defects violated Canadian regulations.
They said they had filed an oral complaint with Transport Canada inspectors, but the regulator did not see any evidence of action.
\"I would be very surprised if it was normal,\" said Merlin Presse, head of civil aviation at Transport Canada.
\"If I notice a specific complaint, they will certainly be investigated.
\"In recent months, Jazz mechanics and the company have been divided on internal working conditions.
Employee complaints against management include allegations of harassment and racial discrimination.
The company denied the allegations.
In this story, none of the mechanics who complained about the maintenance mistakes participated in or complied with the discipline of the work conditions dispute.
One of the most serious allegations of mechanics is rubber O-rings --
Seals used as mechanical components of aircraft--
Are reused, even if they are usually deformed once used, and are no longer appropriate. (
On 1986, the explosion of the Challenger shuttle was blamed on the faulty O-ring. )
\"The standard practice of maintaining the manual is never to reuse O-
A mechanical teacher said, \"always call . \"
\"You put a new one (in)
Because it will seal properly when it is sealed . \"
\"But in jazz, if you don\'t have O-
Ring, don\'t worry.
Clean it and reuse it in the same place.
\"Their idea is that we have a $30 million plane that will fly from Toronto to Houston and the plane will stop for $5. ring.
Just put it back. Put it back.
\"I said, \'No, take the parts \'. . .
But they put pressure on us.
The Sir denied the charges.
\"Everything we do, including the replacement of disposable parts, follows established standard operating procedures and manufacturer\'s standards.
\"Anstey, who has worked at Jazz for eight years, says there have been problems with the resources and skills that undermine security.
\"My company doesn\'t want to spend the money needed on the right tools or parts.
\"Our staff have never had any specific aircraft training,\" he said . \".
\"Most of the time, their work is unsupervised, because a lot of work is needed every night to maintain a batch of aging aircraft. \"750 non-
Jazz said 16 of the management mechanics working for Jazz were unlicensed apprentices working under the supervision of licensed mechanics.
Sir Toronto maintenance team fatigue is another problem, says Anstey.
Most of the work on the plane happened between 11. m. and 5:30 a. m. , he said.
\"I \'ve been on the night shift for over eight years and no matter how hard you try, you\'re exhausted at four in the morning. m.
Imagine a worker who was replacing the engine fell asleep.
Forget a Bolt here, it is very easy to connect a Cannon plug there.
The company says night shift is the standard for aviation mechanics whose employees can get enough rest between shifts.
In fact, Jazz\'s policy on maintaining crew rest exceeds the regulatory requirements of Transport Canada.
A mechanic said that the \"Jazz aircraft\" side aircraft often had door sealing problems.
The problem in June 2003 was so extreme that daylight could be seen from the cracks and curtains could be seen from the door seams.
Then emergency landing.
According to the mechanical teacher, \"We have one (recently)
It was all broken, it was all damaged, I called them and they basically said, \'OK, let\'s see if we can get on this plane because it\'s going to be overnight in Toronto.
I fought with them.
I did not let it go.
The mechanic says silicone is often used for temporary repairs.
Jazz stated in the statement that its mechanics \"use repair glue to temporarily repair door seals as recommended by the manufacturer\'s repair engineer order (REO), adding that, the company will \"never compromise safety in order to meet the following requirements\"
Time performance.
Mechanics like Ballestrin say they will now think twice when they set foot on the plane.
\"Before I entered the aviation field, I used to fly and didn\'t think about anything.
Every time I get on the bus, I know what I know now.
He says his seven-year experience in the industry has disappointed him.
\"It\'s all about money.
Sadly, that\'s why security is second place. . . It\'s on-
Time performance first, safety second.
\"The four mechanics who gave the speech said they were afraid of the influence of jazz, but in any case they were very concerned about talking about it.
I don\'t know if this maintenance problem will occur with other airlines. fvallance-jones@thespec. com905-526-
2499 what happened.
During the maintenance period of jazz Sprint 8 in October.
2002, one-
The meter portion of the leading edge of the left wing is removed, which includes removing screws from the top and bottom of the panel. 2. When re-
Install the part and apply the sealant, the top of the part is fixed, but the bottom is not fixed, which requires 14 screws. 3.
Two days later, on October, the plane took off from Pearson International Airport.
7: 50, 2002. m.
To the Conne Windsor Lock. 4.
When the plane took off
Run, three-
The foot of the leading edge of the wing (with the de-
Connected ice boots)
Separate from the left wing and fall on the runway.
The crew felt the vibration of the control during the initial climb and returned to the airport while the emergency crew was on standby. 5.
The report of the Transportation Safety Board later found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The company blamed the accident on \"human error\" and changed the procedure.
Source: Committee on traffic safety (Jun 12, 2006)
The mechanics of Air Canada\'s major regional airlines say they often feel pressured to cut corners and put aircraft in the air that may endanger public safety.
Some say their concerns are so serious that they are nervous about taking their own airline.
More than a dozen maintenance engineers at Air Canada\'s Jazz are working in the company\'s Toronto operations division, and they say that the economic need to keep planes flying often exceeds the safety decisions they want to make.
Four of them took unusual steps to publicly express their concerns.
\"The pressure on the plane to take off is incredible,\" said Sir mechanic Grant annastas . \".
\"I didn\'t feel the management wanted the plane to take off safely.
\"It\'s just, \'Take it out.
No one wants to be hit for delay.
\"How safe is our sky?
Over the past seven months, journalists from Hamilton bystanders, Toronto Star and Waterloo regional records have been asking questions about aviation safety.
What they found was a flight safety system that tightened at the seams.
The airline received a highly critical audit from Transport Canada in 2003, denied the company\'s allegations and said safety was a top priority.
\"Jazz never hurts safety,\" the company said in a written reply . \". \"While on-
Time performance is definitely a jazz goal. We never sacrifice safety.
\"Jazz is the second largest airline in the United States (
Next to Air Canada)
It is also one of the largest regional airlines in the world.
Nearly 6 million people fly 136 planes to 80 North American cities every year.
The Jazz mechanics who spoke to reporters said they refused to sign the aircraft for service to keep the aircraft on the ground with mechanical defects.
But they say that in many cases their superiors just find other mechanics to sign the plane-
Or they sign it. -
To avoid expensive flight delays.
\"It\'s a shame, but I was nervous when I was flying on my own airline,\" said Ronald Anstie, the airline\'s flight attendant at the Toronto hangar.
\"I asked the supervisor to ask me to log out the damaged thing --of-
Limit, fix the error (or)
Illegal repair
I was considered a troublemaker when I refused. . .
I think the management is more concerned.
It\'s more time-saving than sending a safe plane to the gate.
\"The bombing allegations raise disturbing questions about the safety of the Canadian aviation industry.
Records from Hamilton onlookers, Toronto Star and Waterloo area are investigating aviation safety and finding it difficult for a system to keep up with the increasingly crowded sky.
Over the past five years, more than 80,000 passengers have been in danger when the plane\'s sky in Canada has been dangerously close.
Meanwhile, allegations of mechanical problems and violations of aviation regulations are rising.
In a dramatic event in 2002, when it took off in Toronto, the front wing of the jazz Sprint 8 fell off with a metre of debris.
The crew returned after noticing the vibration of the flight control device.
The transportation safety committee attributed it to hasty maintenance.
This could lead to a crash, Sir mechanical said.
\"It was a small shot.
If it\'s a bigger plane, the plane will disappear, \"said Gianni Ballestrin, 34, a maintenance engineer from Jazz for seven years.
Anastas said: \"They put the screws on the top, but they never put the screws on the bottom. \"Then (a supervisor)
Pull over the people who are doing the work. . .
Do another job. .
They pulled him down and he never went back to finish it.
\"The TSB survey found that before completing the work, a maintenance supervisor called away a mechanic at work.
\"Before The Apprentice (mechanic)
What he can do is not just cut off the sealing material at the front of the right wing, he is re-
\"My task is to go to the ramp,\" the report wrote . \".
The TSB also found: * when the task was clearly not able to be completed by the end of the shift, another mechanic at work \"felt rushed \".
\"* The duties of the crew chief\" are not documented in detail and formal training is not provided.
\"* Company\" does not have specific procedures to convey the working status of shift turnover.
The report also found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation and found \"some flaws\" that caused the program to change \".
The company said the accident was not caused by the hurried mechanic not doing the work seriously.
\"This is due to human error,\" the company said in a statement . \".
\"We immediately implemented the pass in our maintenance area-
For unfinished work, the information \"swing\" procedure from the crew to the crew.
Anastas said that the procedure did change for a period of time after the incident to double-check the leader-
Edge mount, but practice sliding back to the previous way.
Another jazz mechanic who has worked at the company for nine years, Dave awella, admitted that keeping the plane in the air can cause extreme pressure.
\"There is a lot of pressure and pressure in the aircraft maintenance environment.
On-pressure
\"Time performance sometimes affects the quality of aircraft maintenance engineers and attention to detail,\" he said . \".
\"There are things we want to solve but we can\'t because we don\'t have time to do or the company doesn\'t want the plane to crash.
It could put a brutal strain on the mechanics, he said: \"Endless 12-
Hours of night shift, no meeting of family for several days, physical properties of working hours and day rotation, chemicals. . .
The list continues.
\"The Department of Transport Canada\'s audit of the airline in 2003 found that\" the focus of the maintenance and operations department has been compromised so that some of the most basic regulatory and quality control tasks have deteriorated.
Airline spokesman Debra Williams said the issues were corrected after the audit.
\"That was three years ago.
Great changes have taken place since then.
We work with the Transport Canada on all of these projects.
\"But after an accident on September 2004, the Jazz was again forced to change its maintenance practices, in which the pilot took control of Kingston\'s dashboard 8-to-
It is difficult to control the plane.
About 30 seconds after takeoff, the captain declared an emergency and later found that the emergency was related to loose nuts falling off in the aircraft pitch control system.
When the plane landed safely, a TSB survey found a defect in Jazz\'s mechanical procedure. Jazz\'s flight-
Crew training has been criticized for not being fully prepared for such an emergency.
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation again and found \"some defects \".
\"In this case, Jazz immediately took corrective action to deal with the accident by modifying its maintenance and flight operation procedures,\" the company\'s statement wrote . \".
In addition to Anastas, Anstey, Avella and Ballestrin, eight other jazz mechanics also spoke without using their names.
If the Jazz knew who they were, they feared it would be affected.
Four people on record have similar concerns, but they think public safety is more important than any disciplinary action they may face.
Several mechanics agreed that, on average, a jazz plane left Toronto Pearson International Airport once a week and that mechanical defects violated Canadian regulations.
They said they had filed an oral complaint with Transport Canada inspectors, but the regulator did not see any evidence of action.
\"I would be very surprised if it was normal,\" said Merlin Presse, head of civil aviation at Transport Canada.
\"If I notice a specific complaint, they will certainly be investigated.
\"In recent months, Jazz mechanics and the company have been divided on internal working conditions.
Employee complaints against management include allegations of harassment and racial discrimination.
The company denied the allegations.
In this story, none of the mechanics who complained about the maintenance mistakes participated in or complied with the discipline of the work conditions dispute.
One of the most serious allegations of mechanics is rubber O-rings --
Seals used as mechanical components of aircraft--
Are reused, even if they are usually deformed once used, and are no longer appropriate. (
On 1986, the explosion of the Challenger shuttle was blamed on the faulty O-ring. )
\"The standard practice of maintaining the manual is never to reuse O-
A mechanical teacher said, \"always call . \"
\"You put a new one (in)
Because it will seal properly when it is sealed . \"
\"But in jazz, if you don\'t have O-
Ring, don\'t worry.
Clean it and reuse it in the same place.
\"Their idea is that we have a $30 million plane that will fly from Toronto to Houston and the plane will stop for $5. ring.
Just put it back. Put it back.
\"I said, \'No, take the parts \'. . .
But they put pressure on us.
The Sir denied the charges.
\"Everything we do, including the replacement of disposable parts, follows established standard operating procedures and manufacturer\'s standards.
\"Anstey, who has worked at Jazz for eight years, says there have been problems with the resources and skills that undermine security.
\"My company doesn\'t want to spend the money needed on the right tools or parts.
\"Our staff have never had any specific aircraft training,\" he said . \".
\"Most of the time, their work is unsupervised, because a lot of work is needed every night to maintain a batch of aging aircraft. \"750 non-
Jazz said 16 of the management mechanics working for Jazz were unlicensed apprentices working under the supervision of licensed mechanics.
Sir Toronto maintenance team fatigue is another problem, says Anstey.
Most of the work on the plane happened between 11. m. and 5:30 a. m. , he said.
\"I \'ve been on the night shift for over eight years and no matter how hard you try, you\'re exhausted at four in the morning. m.
Imagine a worker who was replacing the engine fell asleep.
Forget a Bolt here, it is very easy to connect a Cannon plug there.
The company says night shift is the standard for aviation mechanics whose employees can get enough rest between shifts.
In fact, Jazz\'s policy on maintaining crew rest exceeds the regulatory requirements of Transport Canada.
A mechanic said that the \"Jazz aircraft\" side aircraft often had door sealing problems.
The problem in June 2003 was so extreme that daylight could be seen from the cracks and curtains could be seen from the door seams.
Then emergency landing.
According to the mechanical teacher, \"We have one (recently)
It was all broken, it was all damaged, I called them and they basically said, \'OK, let\'s see if we can get on this plane because it\'s going to be overnight in Toronto.
I fought with them.
I did not let it go.
The mechanic says silicone is often used for temporary repairs.
Jazz stated in the statement that its mechanics \"use repair glue to temporarily repair door seals as recommended by the manufacturer\'s repair engineer order (REO), adding that, the company will \"never compromise safety in order to meet the following requirements\"
Time performance.
Mechanics like Ballestrin say they will now think twice when they set foot on the plane.
\"Before I entered the aviation field, I used to fly and didn\'t think about anything.
Every time I get on the bus, I know what I know now.
He says his seven-year experience in the industry has disappointed him.
\"It\'s all about money.
Sadly, that\'s why security is second place. . . It\'s on-
Time performance first, safety second.
\"The four mechanics who gave the speech said they were afraid of the influence of jazz, but in any case they were very concerned about talking about it.
I don\'t know if this maintenance problem will occur with other airlines. fvallance-jones@thespec. com905-526-
2499 what happened.
During the maintenance period of jazz Sprint 8 in October.
2002, one-
The meter portion of the leading edge of the left wing is removed, which includes removing screws from the top and bottom of the panel. 2. When re-
Install the part and apply the sealant, the top of the part is fixed, but the bottom is not fixed, which requires 14 screws. 3.
Two days later, on October, the plane took off from Pearson International Airport.
7: 50, 2002. m.
To the Conne Windsor Lock. 4.
When the plane took off
Run, three-
The foot of the leading edge of the wing (with the de-
Connected ice boots)
Separate from the left wing and fall on the runway.
The crew felt the vibration of the control during the initial climb and returned to the airport while the emergency crew was on standby. 5.
The report of the Transportation Safety Board later found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The company blamed the accident on \"human error\" and changed the procedure.
Source: Committee on traffic safety (Jun 12, 2006)
The mechanics of Air Canada\'s major regional airlines say they often feel pressured to cut corners and put aircraft in the air that may endanger public safety.
Some say their concerns are so serious that they are nervous about taking their own airline.
More than a dozen maintenance engineers at Air Canada\'s Jazz are working in the company\'s Toronto operations division, and they say that the economic need to keep planes flying often exceeds the safety decisions they want to make.
Four of them took unusual steps to publicly express their concerns.
\"The pressure on the plane to take off is incredible,\" said Sir mechanic Grant annastas . \".
\"I didn\'t feel the management wanted the plane to take off safely.
\"It\'s just, \'Take it out.
No one wants to be hit for delay.
\"How safe is our sky?
Over the past seven months, journalists from Hamilton bystanders, Toronto Star and Waterloo regional records have been asking questions about aviation safety.
What they found was a flight safety system that tightened at the seams.
The airline received a highly critical audit from Transport Canada in 2003, denied the company\'s allegations and said safety was a top priority.
\"Jazz never hurts safety,\" the company said in a written reply . \". \"While on-
Time performance is definitely a jazz goal. We never sacrifice safety.
\"Jazz is the second largest airline in the United States (
Next to Air Canada)
It is also one of the largest regional airlines in the world.
Nearly 6 million people fly 136 planes to 80 North American cities every year.
The Jazz mechanics who spoke to reporters said they refused to sign the aircraft for service to keep the aircraft on the ground with mechanical defects.
But they say that in many cases their superiors just find other mechanics to sign the plane-
Or they sign it. -
To avoid expensive flight delays.
\"It\'s a shame, but I was nervous when I was flying on my own airline,\" said Ronald Anstie, the airline\'s flight attendant at the Toronto hangar.
\"I asked the supervisor to ask me to log out the damaged thing --of-
Limit, fix the error (or)
Illegal repair
I was considered a troublemaker when I refused. . .
I think the management is more concerned.
It\'s more time-saving than sending a safe plane to the gate.
\"The bombing allegations raise disturbing questions about the safety of the Canadian aviation industry.
Records from Hamilton onlookers, Toronto Star and Waterloo area are investigating aviation safety and finding it difficult for a system to keep up with the increasingly crowded sky.
Over the past five years, more than 80,000 passengers have been in danger when the plane\'s sky in Canada has been dangerously close.
Meanwhile, allegations of mechanical problems and violations of aviation regulations are rising.
In a dramatic event in 2002, when it took off in Toronto, the front wing of the jazz Sprint 8 fell off with a metre of debris.
The crew returned after noticing the vibration of the flight control device.
The transportation safety committee attributed it to hasty maintenance.
This could lead to a crash, Sir mechanical said.
\"It was a small shot.
If it\'s a bigger plane, the plane will disappear, \"said Gianni Ballestrin, 34, a maintenance engineer from Jazz for seven years.
Anastas said: \"They put the screws on the top, but they never put the screws on the bottom. \"Then (a supervisor)
Pull over the people who are doing the work. . .
Do another job. .
They pulled him down and he never went back to finish it.
\"The TSB survey found that before completing the work, a maintenance supervisor called away a mechanic at work.
\"Before The Apprentice (mechanic)
What he can do is not just cut off the sealing material at the front of the right wing, he is re-
\"My task is to go to the ramp,\" the report wrote . \".
The TSB also found: * when the task was clearly not able to be completed by the end of the shift, another mechanic at work \"felt rushed \".
\"* The duties of the crew chief\" are not documented in detail and formal training is not provided.
\"* Company\" does not have specific procedures to convey the working status of shift turnover.
The report also found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation and found \"some flaws\" that caused the program to change \".
The company said the accident was not caused by the hurried mechanic not doing the work seriously.
\"This is due to human error,\" the company said in a statement . \".
\"We immediately implemented the pass in our maintenance area-
For unfinished work, the information \"swing\" procedure from the crew to the crew.
Anastas said that the procedure did change for a period of time after the incident to double-check the leader-
Edge mount, but practice sliding back to the previous way.
Another jazz mechanic who has worked at the company for nine years, Dave awella, admitted that keeping the plane in the air can cause extreme pressure.
\"There is a lot of pressure and pressure in the aircraft maintenance environment.
On-pressure
\"Time performance sometimes affects the quality of aircraft maintenance engineers and attention to detail,\" he said . \".
\"There are things we want to solve but we can\'t because we don\'t have time to do or the company doesn\'t want the plane to crash.
It could put a brutal strain on the mechanics, he said: \"Endless 12-
Hours of night shift, no meeting of family for several days, physical properties of working hours and day rotation, chemicals. . .
The list continues.
\"The Department of Transport Canada\'s audit of the airline in 2003 found that\" the focus of the maintenance and operations department has been compromised so that some of the most basic regulatory and quality control tasks have deteriorated.
Airline spokesman Debra Williams said the issues were corrected after the audit.
\"That was three years ago.
Great changes have taken place since then.
We work with the Transport Canada on all of these projects.
\"But after an accident on September 2004, the Jazz was again forced to change its maintenance practices, in which the pilot took control of Kingston\'s dashboard 8-to-
It is difficult to control the plane.
About 30 seconds after takeoff, the captain declared an emergency and later found that the emergency was related to loose nuts falling off in the aircraft pitch control system.
When the plane landed safely, a TSB survey found a defect in Jazz\'s mechanical procedure. Jazz\'s flight-
Crew training has been criticized for not being fully prepared for such an emergency.
The TSB reported that Jazz conducted an internal investigation again and found \"some defects \".
\"In this case, Jazz immediately took corrective action to deal with the accident by modifying its maintenance and flight operation procedures,\" the company\'s statement wrote . \".
In addition to Anastas, Anstey, Avella and Ballestrin, eight other jazz mechanics also spoke without using their names.
If the Jazz knew who they were, they feared it would be affected.
Four people on record have similar concerns, but they think public safety is more important than any disciplinary action they may face.
Several mechanics agreed that, on average, a jazz plane left Toronto Pearson International Airport once a week and that mechanical defects violated Canadian regulations.
They said they had filed an oral complaint with Transport Canada inspectors, but the regulator did not see any evidence of action.
\"I would be very surprised if it was normal,\" said Merlin Presse, head of civil aviation at Transport Canada.
\"If I notice a specific complaint, they will certainly be investigated.
\"In recent months, Jazz mechanics and the company have been divided on internal working conditions.
Employee complaints against management include allegations of harassment and racial discrimination.
The company denied the allegations.
In this story, none of the mechanics who complained about the maintenance mistakes participated in or complied with the discipline of the work conditions dispute.
One of the most serious allegations of mechanics is rubber O-rings --
Seals used as mechanical components of aircraft--
Are reused, even if they are usually deformed once used, and are no longer appropriate. (
On 1986, the explosion of the Challenger shuttle was blamed on the faulty O-ring. )
\"The standard practice of maintaining the manual is never to reuse O-
A mechanical teacher said, \"always call . \"
\"You put a new one (in)
Because it will seal properly when it is sealed . \"
\"But in jazz, if you don\'t have O-
Ring, don\'t worry.
Clean it and reuse it in the same place.
\"Their idea is that we have a $30 million plane that will fly from Toronto to Houston and the plane will stop for $5. ring.
Just put it back. Put it back.
\"I said, \'No, take the parts \'. . .
But they put pressure on us.
The Sir denied the charges.
\"Everything we do, including the replacement of disposable parts, follows established standard operating procedures and manufacturer\'s standards.
\"Anstey, who has worked at Jazz for eight years, says there have been problems with the resources and skills that undermine security.
\"My company doesn\'t want to spend the money needed on the right tools or parts.
\"Our staff have never had any specific aircraft training,\" he said . \".
\"Most of the time, their work is unsupervised, because a lot of work is needed every night to maintain a batch of aging aircraft. \"750 non-
Jazz said 16 of the management mechanics working for Jazz were unlicensed apprentices working under the supervision of licensed mechanics.
Sir Toronto maintenance team fatigue is another problem, says Anstey.
Most of the work on the plane happened between 11. m. and 5:30 a. m. , he said.
\"I \'ve been on the night shift for over eight years and no matter how hard you try, you\'re exhausted at four in the morning. m.
Imagine a worker who was replacing the engine fell asleep.
Forget a Bolt here, it is very easy to connect a Cannon plug there.
The company says night shift is the standard for aviation mechanics whose employees can get enough rest between shifts.
In fact, Jazz\'s policy on maintaining crew rest exceeds the regulatory requirements of Transport Canada.
A mechanic said that the \"Jazz aircraft\" side aircraft often had door sealing problems.
The problem in June 2003 was so extreme that daylight could be seen from the cracks and curtains could be seen from the door seams.
Then emergency landing.
According to the mechanical teacher, \"We have one (recently)
It was all broken, it was all damaged, I called them and they basically said, \'OK, let\'s see if we can get on this plane because it\'s going to be overnight in Toronto.
I fought with them.
I did not let it go.
The mechanic says silicone is often used for temporary repairs.
Jazz stated in the statement that its mechanics \"use repair glue to temporarily repair door seals as recommended by the manufacturer\'s repair engineer order (REO), adding that, the company will \"never compromise safety in order to meet the following requirements\"
Time performance.
Mechanics like Ballestrin say they will now think twice when they set foot on the plane.
\"Before I entered the aviation field, I used to fly and didn\'t think about anything.
Every time I get on the bus, I know what I know now.
He says his seven-year experience in the industry has disappointed him.
\"It\'s all about money.
Sadly, that\'s why security is second place. . . It\'s on-
Time performance first, safety second.
\"The four mechanics who gave the speech said they were afraid of the influence of jazz, but in any case they were very concerned about talking about it.
I don\'t know if this maintenance problem will occur with other airlines. fvallance-jones@thespec. com905-526-
2499 what happened.
During the maintenance period of jazz Sprint 8 in October.
2002, one-
The meter portion of the leading edge of the left wing is removed, which includes removing screws from the top and bottom of the panel. 2. When re-
Install the part and apply the sealant, the top of the part is fixed, but the bottom is not fixed, which requires 14 screws. 3.
Two days later, on October, the plane took off from Pearson International Airport.
7: 50, 2002. m.
To the Conne Windsor Lock. 4.
When the plane took off
Run, three-
The foot of the leading edge of the wing (with the de-
Connected ice boots)
Separate from the left wing and fall on the runway.
The crew felt the vibration of the control during the initial climb and returned to the airport while the emergency crew was on standby. 5.
The report of the Transportation Safety Board later found that the proportion of the company\'s experienced mechanics to inexperienced mechanics was \"very low \".
The company blamed the accident on \"human error\" and changed the procedure.
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